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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
afghanistan. the city's mayor was assassinated by a suicide bomber who hit a bomb-- hid a bomb in his turbin. cbs news correspondent mandy clark interviewed the mayor when she was in kandahar and included him in a story about an american soldier who is playing an unusual role there. here's her report. >> reporter: jim crawford may not look like it, but he's a u.s. army major, part of a program called "afghan hands," designed to mentor government officials. >> hey, how's it going? >> how you been? >> good, good. >> reporter: to break down barriers he wears local clothing and a full beard, mike most afghan men. when we visited kandahar earlier this month, crawford was anxious to introduce us to the city's mayor, ghulam haider hamidi. >> there are a lot of good afghans here working and working very hard and risking their life. he's one of them. so the people here are really lucky to have him as mayor. >> reporter: that luck ran out today. a suicide bomber got into the same corridor as the city hall the mayor had guide us through. on that day he told us he was fatalistic about the dangers he fac
clark in kandahar, afghanistan's most dangerous city. she comes under attack while wearing a berka. >> reporter: another stone was just thrown at me-- ow! >> just today the city's mayor was assassinated in a brazen attack. cell phone safety: to all those minutes add up to health problems for kids? dr. jon lapook reports. and it's a place where wounded warriors learn to hope again. david martin on the closing of walter reed. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> schieffer: good evening, scott's off tonight. i'm bob schieffer. the fallout from washington's inability to find a solution to the budget crisis and raise the debt limit has, apparently, begun. on wall street, the stock market was down for the third day in a row. the dow fell more than 198 point today. for the week, it's down nearly 400 points, and it has lost close to $105 billion in value. some of the bond rating services are now saying that even if congress does reach an agreement on a budget plan, it may be too late to avoid lowering the rating on some american securities. we ha
in 2002 in pakistan and held at a secret prison in afghanistan known as the salt pit. hosed down and left in an unheated cell overnight, rahman died of hypothermia. neither prisoner had been singled out for special interrogation. they both apparently died of simple misuse or neglect. >> pelley: david, what are you hearing about the c.i.a.'s reaction to this today? >> reporter: well, this happens to be c.i.a. director leon panetta's last day on the job before he takes over as secretary of defense. none of this happened on his watch, but he is clearly pleased by the decision. he issued a statement, saying "we are now finally about to close this chapter in our agency's history." >> pelley: thank you, david. leon panetta will be taking over tomorrow for robert gates. today, president obama surprised the outgoing defense secretary with a going-away present: the medal of freedom, the nation's highest civilian award. gates was appointed by president george w. bush four and a half years ago and stayed on to help president obama manage the wars in iraq and afghanistan. we have done a number of sto
attacks against u.s. troops in afghanistan. two sources tell us that he was killed last month in pakistan by a u.s. drone. one official said to us today, "we know we got him this time." at the white house today, the president said he will begin sending condolence letters to families of troops who commit suicide in a war zone. troops who die in combat have always received this honor. but for generations, suicide victims have not been acknowledged by the president. the white house has been reviewing this policy, but mr. obama took action one week after elaine quijano first reported this story on our broadcast. elaine? >> reporter: well, scott, the president says he made the change to the condolence letter policy to remove the stigma associated with one of the unseen wounds of war-- suicide. in a written statement, the president said: the group iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, which has been advocating for more mental health programs for veterans, called the president's action long overdue. >> while we think this is a positive first step, i think a lot more needs to be done, that th
in to government computers. plans for the wars in iraq and afghanistan, secret information about american satellites, plans for a new fighter plane are gone, vacuumed up in computer hacking apparently by hostile governments. the confirmation came today in a speech in washington by deputy secretary of defense william lynn. >> to date, malicious cyber activity has been directed at nearly every sector of our infrastructure and economy. our national security correspondent david martin has been investigating and hi managed to get the first television camera ever into the pentagon's command center that defends against computer attacks. david also spoke to deputy secretary lynn about the information that's been lost. >> reporter: the joint strike fighter is the pentagon's high- priced ticket to air superiority for the 21st century. except four months ago the designs for that and other sophisticated weapons were stolen from defense industry computers by hackers-- 24,000 files in all. >> designs of satellites, u.a.v.s-- unmanned aerial vehicles-- cutting-edge military technology. >> reporter: is s
't get the help they needed must change." the group iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, which has been advocating for more mental health programs for veterans, called the president's action long overdue. >> while we think this is a positive first step, i think a lot more needs to be done, that the white house really needs to redouble its resolve to addressing this suicide epidemic head on. >> would not try to seek honor, nor was he being a coward. >> reporter: if anyone can be credited with changing the policy it's greg and janet keesling, they have been fighting for the change since 2009. that's the year their son, 25-year-old army specialist chance keesling, killed himself on his second tour in iraq. they say acknowledgement from the president gives them some comfort. >> he was a good soldier. so i think that's the part that i want to know that the country appreciates, that he fought, he did everything he was asked to do. >> reporter: but there are still military families who will not be receiving condolence letters. the policy change does not include suicide or training acciden
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)